Bearing Arms in Late Medieval Strassburg Law

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  • #2748
    Philologus
    Participant

    The transcription of this law from 1452 is complete, the translation is not because I have too many other irons in the fire https://ageofdatini.info/fontes/laws-weapons-strassburg.html

    #2750
    Hans Hellinger
    Moderator

    This is great! I can’t remember if this was related to your work or not but I was discussing some of these ordinances with Olivier Dupuis recently. The interpretation of the raw data is a bit of a challenge. I’m working on a guide to Strasbourg for HEMA fencers right now so I’ll definitely draw upon your transcription, if you don’t mind, and of course I’ll credit your work.

    #2769
    Philologus
    Participant

    Feel free! There are so many old law books from central Europe that we don’t have to treat the law from London and the coroner’s reports from 14th century London as our go-to example of ‘medieval law on carrying weapons.’ Maybe things were different in other places, maybe not, if someone spends enough time reading old script the evidence is out there.

    There is another law in that book about members of the militia carrying a sword or langes Messer when on duty in the streets.

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 5 days ago by Philologus.
    #2771
    Hans Hellinger
    Moderator

    Yes I have data on this from Breslau / Wroclaw, Frankfurt am Main, Krakow, Nuremberg, Augsburg, Lübeck, Hamburg, Bologna (13th C), Bruges, Gdansk / Danzig, Riga, Cologne and Zurich, mostly for the 15th Century.

    The consensus during our discussion on the Strasbourg laws was that they were not very restrictive except for lower status (knechten) and non-citizens, and even there exceptions seem to be made. But it did seem to be getting more strict over time.

    I certainly wouldn’t rely on data from London for anything about Central or Continental Northern Europe.

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